Archive for the ‘Concurrent Therapies’ Category

Dec 7, 2018

Platelet Therapy: A Complement to Stem Cell Therapy

In addition to stem cell processing services, VetStem distributes platelet therapy kits to small and large animal veterinarians across the United States and Canada.  Platelet therapy is similar to stem cell therapy in that the patient’s own cells are collected, concentrated, and then reinjected into the affected area.  Unlike stem cell therapy, platelet therapy requires a blood collection and the process of concentrating the healing cells is performed by your veterinarian in the clinic.

How does platelet therapy work?  The scientific answer is that platelets activate by exposure to damaged tissue, releasing their granular contents which include anabolic growth factors.  These growth factors help attract progenitor cells to the injury site and play a key role in stimulating tissue repair through fibroblast expansion and cellular matrix production.  In other, less technical terms, when the concentrated platelets are injected into the site of damaged tissue, the platelets signal additional healing cells to migrate to the affected area to begin the process of tissue repair.

The great thing about platelet therapy is it can be performed in conjunction with stem cell therapy to further aid the healing process.  In our opinion, stem cell and platelet therapies are very different regenerative medicine solutions that can work synergistically. They each have their place and can benefit patients in different circumstances. We see the combination of adipose stem cell therapy and platelet therapy as the “platinum standard” for regenerative medicine.  While the idea of stem cell therapy is to deliver as many regenerative cells to the affected area as possible, by adding platelet therapy on top of it, additional healing cells will migrate to the area to further stimulate local tissue repair processes.  And like stem cell therapy, platelet therapy is autologous, meaning the animal is both the donor and the recipient.  Thus, there is minimal risk of rejection and reaction when performed under sterile conditions.

Our primary platelet therapy product for small animals is Pall Veterinary Platelet Enhancement Therapy or V-PET™.  We’ve seen much success with V-PET™ such as in Pippa Rose’s case and Pearl’s case.  But, similar to stem cell therapy, every patient’s response will vary.  Your veterinarian can best determine if your dog may benefit from platelet therapy.

If you have questions or would like VetStem to help you locate a platelet therapy provider near you, please contact us.  To read more about platelet therapy and success stories, click here and here.

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Apr 9, 2010

Big Love: Pet obesity and dog arthritis expands in United States

I have devoted previous posts to the important subject of pet obesity and the effects on canine and feline arthritis.  I would like to revisit the subject again with some great new information  from veterinarian and author Dr Ernie Ward.  I pulled some interesting facts out of the article but if you would like to read it in it’s entirety click here.  Dr Ward is passionate about educating pet owners about pet obesity. Why is obesity in pets on the uprise?  Part of the obesity problem is lack of exercise and poor portion control.  According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), when it comes to expressing our affections with food, we are doing our animals a lot more harm than good. Read the rest of this entry »

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Feb 15, 2010

What are bloggers saying about stem cell therapy for dogs?

As all of you know, I am personally dedicated to Vet-Stem and the mission of relieving pain in our animal companions. I am proud of what Vet-Stem has accomplished but I am a veterinarian first and foremost. I often use the Internet and read literature to find new ways that dogs can be treated for arthritis.  In my travels, I see many blogs, stories, YouTube videos, and publications about cell therapy and how it helps treat arthritis in dogs.

As we start a new year, I wanted to share a list of the best sites and stories of 2009 that can provide more information and different perspectives on arthritis and stem cell therapy.  Happy reading!

OzPets.com – Our friends in Australia.

Dog-Care – Suite 101:  A great overall review of therapy.

WebVet.com: Dr. Pamela Schwartz of AMC in New York City.

Buzzle.com: A good summary of natural treatments.

Scoop:  Nice review of natural treatments and weight management.

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Feb 12, 2010

Is There Such a Thing as Human Stem Cell Treatment too?

The question of human stem cell treatments is one I get asked often as I travel around the country.  The answer is yes, but don’t pick up the phone to call your doctor quite yet.  The process for people takes considerably longer than stem cell treatments for dogs and is filled with red tape that is both political and scientific.

I am speaking at the 2010 Stem Cell Summit in NYC next month and presenting a summary of the collective experiences of all our vets, owner, and patients from the last seven years.  We are all leaders and our data does make a difference. Read the rest of this entry »

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Feb 8, 2010

Vet-Stem reaches a milestone! 5,000 pets treated

When we started Vet-Stem in 2002, many people said it was unrealistic and unreasonable to expect that stem cell therapy for dogs and horses would succeed like we had hoped it would.  The following quote is one I always follow:

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.  Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”  George Bernard Shaw.

Thanks to all of you who trusted that stem cells could help your beloved pet (all 5,000+ of you!), we have started a revolution in the treatment of horses, dogs and cats with arthritis and tendon and ligament injuries. Read the rest of this entry »

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Jan 14, 2010

New Hope for Rescue Dogs with Bad Joints

Posted by Bob under Concurrent Therapies, Dog Arthritis

Tommy Boy 1I think it is really admirable that many pet owners will adopt from shelters and rescues, thereby giving that lucky dog or cat a whole new life.  Those new pet owners have made an emotional as well as financial investment in their new family members.  Besides behavioral issues, many dogs may have found their way into shelters because former pet owners could not afford the treatment and care for orthopedic issues.  There are also dogs that have been lost or abandoned for some time, and as a result of being on the streets, may have suffered injuries that have not healed correctly.  That is why I wanted to share the story of Tommy Boy, a gorgeous Golden Retriever rescue in the loving care of his foster mom Sarah through the SCGRR, Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue.  Tommy ended up in a shelter and was originally misdiagnosed with bone cancer.  He was taken to a foster home to die in a better setting.  Follow up x-rays and then ultimately an MRI confirmed that Tommy didn’t have cancer but he had a horrible broken pelvis.  Tommy’s veterinarian suggested stem cell therapy to see if an amputation of his rear leg could be avoided.  The rescue then raised the funds for the surgery and Vet-Stem reduced the cost of the stem cell processing and a year later Tommy’s radiographs continue to show improvement.  We wish Tommy and all the rescues out there that help special patients like Tommy a very Happy 2010!

click here to read Tommy Boy’s whole story.

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Jan 5, 2010

Is my dog too old for stem cell therapy?

A common question pet owners ask when considering treatments for their dog or cat. I asked two very prominent veterinarians, Dr. Jamie Gaynor and Dr. Mike Hutchinson, to share with us their thoughts on this concern.

Dr. Jamie Gaynor, Owner of Peak Performance Veterinary Group, boarded anesthesiologist  and internationally recognized pain expert likes to remind pet owners about the value of quality of life.  Though an older dog may not have a long lifespan, the quality of those last months is extremely important.  For example, a thirteen year old dog may not live more than an additional 2 years- but making those dogs feel better, move more comfortably during the remaining time left is a blessing to both dog and pet owner.  He feels it is all about the quality of life.

Dr. Mike Hutchinson, Owner of Animal General of Cranberry and host of his own radio program, Animal General relayed to me the following story. Read the rest of this entry »

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Dec 29, 2009

What does a stem cell lab look like?

lab 2I would imagine that none of you have ever been in a stem cell lab.  It is a fascinating technology and the laboratory used at Vet-Stem is truly state-of-the-art.  We have had hundreds of visitors tour the lab since the opening in 2003, but regular tours are not conducted while samples are being processed.  We handle the fat sample shipped in by a veterinarian with great care and it is never opened to the room air.  We open the sample tube only inside a sterile hood where the air is filtered through a HEPA air filter that removes contaminants such as bacteria or dust.  Below is a look at one of the “hoods” for handling samples.  Read the rest of this entry »
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Dec 24, 2009

Stem Cell Therapy For Arthritis – How Long Will It Last?

When your pet is treated with adipose stem cells for arthritis in their joints, it is common to ask how long the treatment will last and when should you expect to need to retreat.  In survey data returned from owners of dogs treated with Vet-Stem therapy, over 2/3 of all dogs are not retreated during the first year.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Dec 21, 2009

When we lose a close companion…..

This blog is all about hope and helping our furry friends have the best quality of life possible.  But eventually, we all reach that point where we have to decide if it is time to say goodbye.  In each of our lifetimes, we may have to tread this path 4-5 times, or more for those of us with multiple buddies.

My wife, Sue and I had to make this decision this last week.  Our border collie, Ritz, was 13.  A sudden paralysis of her hind end was the first symptom.  Since we are in the stem cell business, I immediately took her to a quality clinic here in San Diego, and Dr. Nancy Hampel did a complete examination.  Read the rest of this entry »

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