Archive for the ‘Concurrent Therapies’ Category

Dec 11, 2009

You can bank your pet’s stem cells for use in the future too!

I was recently interviewed on a live pod cast with my friends at Pet Sentinel and I am always blown away by the love and dedication that pet owners have towards their best friends.  I thought in this blog I would address a lot of the common questions that came up during our discussion.  A common question was “Can I store the extra cells for use in the future?”  So if you and your veterinarian have chosen stem cell therapy as the right choice for your pet, then you already understand the basic process:  your vet will collect a small fat sample, the lab purifies out the stem cells, and then they are injected back into the painful joint.  But that is not the end of the story.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Nov 30, 2009

Vet-Stem highlighted in the UK

Garry JenkinsGarry Jenkins, based in London, has written a great post about stem cells for dog arthritis on his blog Canine Health.

He covers what Stem Cell Therapy is, how it works, and how stem cells can improve your dog’s life.

“Dogs suffer from a range of orthopaedic problems – from arthritis, osteoarthritis and hereditary dysplasia of the hip and elbow joints, to torn tendons and ligaments and bone fractures. Veterinarians have begun achieving startling results with a revolutionary new treatment, involving the injection of stem cells extracted from the patient’s own fatty tissue.” Read more

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Nov 17, 2009

Arthritis in the dog, Man’s Best Friend or Man’s Best Model?

A common question is “when will this be available for humans?” New therapies do take longer to be allowed in people, but the good news is that Vet-Stem has collected very valuable data from the thousands of dogs and horses that we have helped veterinarians treat for OA and tendon and ligament injuries. The dog is actually a very good model for human osteoarthritis. Dogs are also prone to similar soft tissue injuries such as cruciate ligament ruptures (ACL, knee injury) and tears, conditions that veterinarians have seen great improvement in healing by using stem cells. Read the rest of this entry »

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Nov 14, 2009

The science of stem cells for arthritis & other diseases

With the advent of the internet the amount of information both accurate and interesting is absolutely amazing. As a veterinarian I am constantly challenged to keep current with all the latest advancements, and with stem cells this can really be a challenge. A common search engine for medical literature is PubMed (use www.pubmed.gov if link does not work). Over the past few years the number of reviewed papers on fat derived stem cells has seen incredible growth. There are advances in what stem cells are being used for and in the knowledge of how stem cells do what they do. Read the rest of this entry »

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Nov 10, 2009

Relief for Dogs with Arthritis

Owners have sent us some great videos of their dogs that have been treated with their
own stem cells from fat. One video link is below, but more can be found at www.vetstem.
com


WKRG.com News

Results do vary, and not all are as dramatic as for Bear. While owner surveys showed
that over 80% of dogs treated did improve, that does mean that 20% had little or no change.

No matter what treatments are used, it is important to note that weight loss, a
personalized rehab and exercise program and good teamwork between you and your
veterinarian will help your pet get the most out of the treatment.

Do you take videos of your dog? This could help you to see if they are showing signs
of arthritis and pain.

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Oct 19, 2009

Patient heal Thyself!

You will be surprised to find that it is not only possible, but over 2,000 dogs in the US with arthritis and tendon injuries have already been treated with their OWN stem cells from fat. Yes, their own.

Remember the saying “Patient Heal Thyself?” We all, human and animals, carry around a stem cell repair kit that is used every day in helping heal the minor bumps, bruises, cuts and more serious injuries. These stem cells are called “Adult” stem cells and are found throughout the body. They sit there waiting for the signal that they are needed and they rush to the scene of the injury and begin the healing process. When the body can’t heal the injury totally, then scar tissue fills in so that the body can function. Read the rest of this entry »

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Oct 13, 2009

Pet Pill Poppers vs Stem Cells

More exciting news just released from Vet-Stem. We encourage our dog owners to fill out evaluation forms to tell us how their dogs are feeling after a stem cell treatment for arthritis and other  injuries. What became very interesting is that many of them started to write in their own comments like “Rusty is no longer on his pain meds!”

After seeing a trend in the write ins, we re-designed our evaluations to find out if other pet owners were experiencing the same thing. Read the rest of this entry »

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Oct 7, 2009

Stem cells from fat help dogs with arthritis

Owner Spotlight: Anne Marie & Dasha Ogle

Anne Marie Ogle of Napanoch, the owner of Dasha, a 9 year-old German Shepherd, hoped to find a therapy to improve her pet’s quality of life. Two vets from Rondout Valley Veterinary Associates in Kerhonkson studied up on the process offered by Vet-Stem. The results were miraculous for Dasha.  Anne Marie found just what she was looking for.

Has your veterinarian heard about stem cells for pets?

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Sep 30, 2009

Healing your horse’s bowed tendon with stem cells

Posted by Bob under Concurrent Therapies, Horse Injuries

A bowed tendon is commonly an injury to end horse’s racing career, and even result in death, but now stem cells are changing that. The American Quarter Horse Racing Journal highlights the use of fat derived stem cells and tendon repair in horses.  Bowed tendons are common in many horse sports.  Stem cells from fat may be able to help your dog that has a partially torn tendon.

Do you compete with your horse or dog?

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Sep 16, 2009

Stem Cell treatment relieving Indianapolis dog’s pain

Owner Spotlight: Deanna and Zach Winter

For 14-year-old Zack, “His main problem is arthritis,” said owner Deanna Winter. “Trouble walking, trouble sitting and going upstairs.” So she decided to take him to see Dr. Ealing at Broad Ripple Animal Clinic, where he recommended stem cell therapy using stem cells from his own fat. “His quality of life was going down. He couldn’t make it around the block anymore,” said Winter. Read the rest of this entry »

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