Archive for the ‘Vet-Stem Cell Therapy’ Category

Jun 6, 2014

Stem cells: How do they work?

Ready for a little more detail on how stem cells can work?  Great!

Stem cells are kind of multi-purpose, so how they work depends on the particular need.  Ben has volunteered as our example.  Let’s say Ben, being a Border Collie, is so focused on chasing a frisbie that he fails to see the fence in his pathway.  He crashes into the fence Read the rest of this entry »

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May 28, 2014

What are Stem Cells – The Skinny

Ben, my Border Collie buddy, was searching for a simple explanation of what are stem cells.  Hard to decide if you want them for those sore joints or a torn tendon unless you know a little bit about them!

BenHeadTiltSo here is the skinny version.  Stem cells are the natural repair cells of your body, and in the body of your furry buddies.  All animals have them and they are the way we repair injuries such as a torn ligament or a broken bone.  Scientists have been researching these amazing little cells for decades and we know quite a lot about how they do their job.  Click here for a cute video I found on the internet that discusses stem cells and how they function.  It is a little out dated as far as sources of stem cells but educational none-the-less.  I’ll talk about sources in another blog.

The main jobs these stem cells perform are:

Reduce inflammation

Reduce scar tissue

Reduce pain

Repair damage

They are like paramedics…..they rush to the scene of an accident, decide who needs help first, and reduce the damage or injury severity.  Then they call in the doctors and specialists to get the real regeneration job done.

BenFetch1These guardians are located everywhere in the body and are small, unspecialized cells.  Unlike a heart or liver cell, a stem cell can function to repair all the tissues of the body.  They can help repair a ligament, a tendon, cartilage in your joint, or a burn wound.

So there you have the skinny version.  Next post, I will talk a bit more about how these amazing cells actually do their repair.  If you are interested in reading more on the science of stem cells check out this page.

Hope I didn’t put you to sleep.  I think Ben has had enough education for the day…he is ready for a fetch session (I think I fetch as much as he does)!

See you next post!

Dr. Harman

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May 1, 2014

Introduction of a new blog series, “What Are Stem Cells?”

I am back!  Sorry for the absence.  I needed a break from blogging to be able to finish a couple of book chapters on stem cell therapy and to help out our human stem cell therapy friends with our great data from dog, cat, and horse stem cell cases.  But now I am back and ready to start talking with you all again about stem cells for pets, and how we can give them the best quality of life.

Ben Harman pupI have a new furry buddy since last we talked.  His name is Ben; a Type A red Border Collie.  Ben goes nearly everywhere with me, including to talks I give at dog clubs and stables, and he loves to hang out all day at the office.

I gave an almost two hour educational lecture to the Cavalier King Charles pet owners group, Cavelier Circle San Diego, recently and it was clear from all the many questions asked that there is a real interest in stem cell therapy and how it can be used to treat various conditions in our companion animals.  So I will re-start this blog with discussion about the basics of stem cells.

Ben Harman workingBen will be along as your guide and he will try to keep me focused on the topic!  He proofreads for me.

Since the mainstream media focuses on sensationalism in reporting, I want to give you all an honest and straightforward foundation in the basics of stem cell therapy so that you can decide for your pets, and also maybe for yourself soon, what is the right type of treatment when considering regenerative medicine.

We will talk over the coming weeks about what stem cells really are, how they work, and the practical aspects of how cells are collected and used to treat arthritis and other diseases.  We will cover costs, insurance, and how to choose a veterinarian for your pet’s stem cell procedure.

Stay tuned for the first in this series titled “What are Stem Cells?”

See you then!

Dr. Harman

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Jul 3, 2012

Tucker’s Quality of Life Saved

Tucker was a 4 year old Boxer who was EXPLOSIVE in his energy level.  He would run and play outside for 4-6 hours a day.  One day he saw a cat and followed it off a 12 foot embankment at a dead run.  He sailed through the air and when he landed his right rear leg buckled.  When he got up he was limping and it got worse after a few days, so his pet parents, Larry and Robbi, took him to the vet and he was put on anti-inflammatory medication.

This process went on and off for the next 12 months as his hind leg deteriorated to the point that he could not walk up steps and stopped playing outside.  He did not want to go on walks anymore, other than to go outside and take care of Business.  His pet parents were scared that he would not be able to walk at all in 6-12 more months.  Tucker’s vet Dr. Christi Juliano, at Community Animal Hospital of Poughkeepsie, told Larry and Robbi about Vet-Stem and 1 month past his 5th birthday they did the procedure.

Well, it took 6 months to fully take effect, but he went back to his old self of running, jumping, and playing for hours outside.  It was 2 years on February 5th, 2012 since he had the procedure and he is like a young Boxer again.

Stories like this are why we do what we do!

We are so happy to be a part of your life, Tucker!

Living the Dream!

 

 

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Apr 13, 2012

Horse Champion a Medical Miracle after Vet-Stem Cell Therapy

In this blog, we generally discuss arthritis in dogs.  Today I wanted to share a story of arthritis in an amazing horse.  Now picture, a horse is over 1000 pounds and will NOT lay down and rest on command!  The owners, Liz, Sylvia and Elli, tell this story:

“In late 2006, we noticed that Merritt, A National Champion purebred Arabian horse, was limping at the canter; then he began limping at the trot. It was determined that the cartilage in his right hind fetlock (like an ankle) had disintegrated.  Before stem cell therapy, he could only walk.  We consulted Dr. John McCarroll of Equine Medical Association (940 365-9325)  in Pilot Point, Texas and he recommended the Vet-Stem therapy for Merritt.

Dr. McCarroll did the procedure in August of 2007, after which we slowly began getting Merritt back into condition.  He has since recovered and has steadily regained strength.

He began showing with Sylvia (shown riding here) in performance classes in 2008 and in 2009 placed TOP 10/19 in Purebred English Show Hack, 14-17, at Youth Nationals.  He is now showing in English Show Hack and Dressage!

CP Merritt continues to give all that he has and is never happier than when he is in the show arena. We consider him a MEDICAL MIRACLE!

Vet-Stem Cell Therapy was the answer for Merritt.  He is also a great example of how long the stem cell therapy can provide relief, and all while he was back in the show ring!  Maybe the horses can teach the dogs a few tricks??

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